What is HRD Photography… or High Dynamic Range Imaging?

“High dynamic range imaging or HDR Photography is a set of methods used in imaging and photography to allow a greater dynamic range between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging methods or photographic methods. HDR images can represent more accurately the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, from direct sunlight to faint starlight, and is often captured by way of a plurality of differently exposed pictures of the same subject matter.”

In the simplest terms, HDR Photography will blend together three versions of the same photo. One at normal exposure, one at a lower exposure and one at a higher exposure. This creates a high dynamic range that produces an outstandingly vibrant picture.  Most new cameras come with HDR options built in. Even my Samsung Galaxy SIII has this option provided that you manage to keep your hands from shaking long enough. If not it will produce an outstandingly vibrant blur.

But what about those older pictures in your archives.

It is possible to create a False HDR Effect using Photoshop.

I have looked at a number of different techniques for this and the following is my favourite because the effect is a little more subtle and most of the steps can be done with keyboard shortcuts.

The photos on the left are the originals with the adjusted photos on the right… click to enlarge.

HRD Photography HDR Photography by Jon Valade

HRD Photography with Photoshop Effect HRD Photography with Photoshop Effect

Photography by Jon Valade Photography by Jon Valade

HDR Photography using Photoshop HDR Photography using Photoshop

 Instructions

To create your False HDR Effect using Photoshop, follow the instructions below:

  1. Take your original image and move it from the background to a layer called ‘Original’. Since I will need to create multiple layers with the same image I did this by selecting the image and pasting it into the new layer… this keeps the original image in the buffer to easily paste it a few mre times.
  2. Create a new layer above ‘Original’ and call it ‘Desaturate’. Paste the original image into the layer and change the Blending options to ‘Overlay’
  3. Desaturate the layer (Image > Adjustments > Desaturate) or (SHIFT + CTRL + U)
  4. Invert the layer (Image > Adjustments > Invert) or (CTRL I)
  5. Add around 40 pixels (tweak to your liking)  Gaussian Bluer to the layer (Filter > Bluer > Gaussian Blur
  6. Create a new layer above ‘Desaturate’ and call it ‘linear’
  7. Change the blending option to ‘Linear Light’
  8. Adjust the opacity of ‘Linear’ to somewhere between 25% and 65%

Save it and be fabulous…